Griddle Me This in Fresno! – REAL EATS – The beat on where to eat!

REAL EATS

The beat on where to eat!

Hello! Thank you for reading REAL EATS, The beat on where to eat. On our next adventure we visit…

Griddle Me This in Fresno!

OMG! It felt next to impossible to find a non-chain restaurant in Fresno. But with the help of Yelp we found this treat. Griddle Me This is a new beer and waffle joint in Riverpark. The owner, who was super kind, opened the doors just 8 weeks ago. He’s full of adventure and excitement. We had a great time chatting with him and learning about how this restaurant came to be. And being a Chef’s daughter who is also married to a fantastic home chef, I know the work it takes to start a restaurant so I had to blog about this experience because I truly hope they thrive.

We went there for lunch. The menu had great waffle themed sandwiches. I’ve got their website below so you can check it out. I ordered the Southern Fried Chicken Sandwich it came with delicious jalapeno coleslaw. The waffle was soft, fluffy with a lovely crispy edge. I poured some maple syrup over my first bite and was in heaven.   My husband had the Monty Cristo. I snagged a bite and found it equally delicious. Layered with cheese, prosciutto, turkey and jam – they captured the Monte Cristo and sailed it on a waffle. The sweet potato and potato fires were crispy too. All together I could barely finish my plate. But there wasn’t any waffle left! I’ll tell you that.

Anyway, it’s currently just a stand alone operation and I’m about to email Guy Fieri! With some subtle tweaking of their dishes and a bit more décor – I think Griddle Me This can turn into a local hot spot.

On the Real Estate Front, the train is coming and Fresno is a ripe market for growth and excitement. Worth a look if want to invest! Contact The Caton Team with your real estate and local restaurant question – we know a great pizza joint in town too.

I’ve got links to this great restaurant and local real estate below. Thank you for reading Real Eats – The beat on where to eat.

Griddle Me This website: http://www.griddlemefresno.com

YELP LINKS

My reviews of Griddle Me This on Yelp: http://www.yelp.com/biz/griddle-me-this-fresno-3?hrid=HyuYqgucRpxXTGIajQE18w

Find Griddle Me This on YELP: https://www.yelp.com/biz/griddle-me-this-fresno

Photos of this delicious meal are on Instagram #onlyinFresno
https://instagram.com/thecatonteam

 

I’ve bookmarked this restaurants and much more on my yelp page:

http://www.yelp.com/user_details_bookmarks?userid=gpbsls-_RLpPiE9bv3Zygw

 

HOMES FOR SALE in Fresno – if you’re curious…

 Couple of places I checked out…

http://thecatonteam.com/IDX/2727-W-Bluff-AVE-115-FRESNO-CA-93711/2419901509/0005608

http://thecatonteam.com/IDX/8114-N-Paula-AVE-FRESNO-CA-93720/2419901629/0005608

http://thecatonteam.com/IDX/5455-N-Marty-AVE-191-FRESNO-CA-93711/2419901711/0005608

Curious how much properties are going for in Fresno – click the link below:

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-search/Fresno_CA/type-single-family-home,condo-townhome-row-home-co-op

 

THANK YOU FOR READING!

 

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina

 

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

 

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

 

All restaurant reviews are unsolicited and unpaid. Photos of dishes are my own iphone snaps.

 

 

 

The Psychology of Buying and Selling a House

The Psychology of Buying and Selling a House

How our emotions influence the homes we choose and the prices we pay

By MATTHEW KASSEL

It’s a fact of life: Homes come with far more emotional weight than any other investment we make.

A home is a refuge from the world, a place to raise a family and, for some people, an investment they hope will bring them a good chunk of money down the road. We fall in love with houses in a way that we never fall in love with a portfolio of stocks and bonds.

All too often, though, we don’t realize that how we feel about homes blinds us when it comes time to buy or sell. We let our emotions blind us to cold facts about the market or the realities of ownership. Or we prioritize one set of emotional needs over others that are just are strong but may not be evident at first. And ignoring them can lead us to make bad financial decisions that can affect us for decades to come.

For instance, people might focus on their desire for a house that’s a certain size or style, but ignore the fact that they want to spend as much time as possible with family. So they might buy a “perfect” house that requires them to make a long daily commute to work and keeps them away from home for two extra hours each day.

The home-selling side of the equation brings its own set of thorny issues. Homeowners often have an overly rosy view of their home and expect it to increase in value far beyond reasonable expectations. And when they put it on the market, they often stubbornly cling to their asking price—even if it means leaving it up for sale far longer than they planned, and risking the possibility of not selling it at all.

Here’s a closer look at some psychological missteps that buyers and sellers often make as they wade into the housing market.

Ignoring the big picture

Home buyers are always on the lookout for features—like a longer driveway or bigger backyard—that will make them happier with their home. But people don’t realize that those changes may not make them happier with their life as a whole.

“When people move to a better housing, they think they will be a lot happier overall,” says Shige Oishi, a co-author of a 2010 study on the subject in Social Indicators Research. “When they actually move, however, their overall happiness does not often change because there are many trade-offs in moving.”

One of the biggest trade-offs is commuting. Many move to live in a bigger house, but that bigger house is often farther away from work—so that means more commuting, which tends to add stress and detract from overall happiness. A 2008 study in the Scandinavian Journal of Economics shows that people who had longer commutes reported “lower subjective well-being” than those with shorter commutes. “If you’re moving to a place far away from your friends, but it has nicer stuff, it’s not a great deal for your happiness,” says Elizabeth Dunn, a psychology professor at the University of British Columbia.

In another study in the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, Ms. Dunn and her co-authors explored the matter of expectations vs. reality in another way—by looking at Harvard undergraduates who were randomly assigned to different dormitories. The study showed that first-year students incorrectly predicted what would bring them the most satisfaction from their dorms—physical features like location on campus, the attractiveness of the residence, room size and desirability of the dining hall and facilities.

In the initial survey, the students put no weight on social features, such as relationships with roommates and a sense of community in the residence. But when the researchers checked back in with the students after they’d been living in their dorms, the only thing that appeared to matter for their happiness was the quality of the social factors.

“It’s so easy to get caught up in comparing the physical features of the places you’re looking at,” says Ms. Dunn, “but you should really stop to consider how the places you’re considering will shape your social relationships.”

Overlooking big expenses

People who are buying homes tend to compartmentalize their expenses and not add up the total cost of everything needed to fix up and furnish the house, says Alex Tabarrok, a professor of economics at George Mason University. That can lead them to make poor choices about how much to pay for a home. For instance, they may overspend on a down payment for the house itself and leave themselves without enough money to buy the sort of decorations or furniture that they want. “When you’re getting a house, think about furnishing it at the same time,” says Mr. Tabarrok.

Weighing buying vs. renting

The biggest budgeting concern is, of course, whether you should buy a house at all. Research shows there are psychological benefits to taking the plunge—but also to opting out.

Buying a house can give people a psychological boost by making them feel like they’ve “arrived” and are part of the American ideal. Homeowners also may feel as though they have more control over their lives since they’re not dependent on the whims of a fickle landlord.

But while those factors may lead people into buying a house, there are other negative elements that homeowners don’t discover until after they’ve taken the plunge.

Research, for instance, has shown that home ownership can cause undue stress. The amount of work necessary to maintain a home—such as decorating, or mowing the lawn every weekend—may be too much for some people. Others may be overwhelmed by the financial aspect of ownership, such as being tied to a big monthly mortgage, or keeping up with repairs and other unforeseen costs.

Expecting a big return

When it comes to selling a home, most people aren’t in for a huge payday. Yet many are overly optimistic in their home-price expectations, according to Robert J. Shiller.

Dr. Shiller, a professor of economics at Yale University, co-wrote a paper, updated in 2014, that looked at the ways recent home buyers around the country think about the future values of their properties.

Using questionnaire surveys, Mr. Shiller and his co-authors found, among other things, that home buyers have extremely high long-term price expectations. That can lead people to buy homes that aren’t a good fit in terms of location or social scene just because they seem like good investments. Or they may stake their plans—such as retirement—on a certain return and find themselves scrambling when they come up short. On a larger scale, this over-optimism can lead to speculative booms that warp the market.

While it isn’t entirely clear why homeowners are usually so cheerful about the future, the researchers postulate it may result from the “money illusion”—a failure to take inflation into account.

“Imagine that your grandmother dies, and you’re managing her estate,” Mr. Shiller says. “Her house is worth $30,000 now, and you look at what she paid—$5,000. You think, ‘Wow, that’s a lot.’ Now why does it seem so big? Because you’re not reflecting that all prices went up sixfold” and you’re basically not making a profit after taking inflation into account.

Not wanting to come up short

People have many reasons for selling their homes, and for setting the prices they do. But research has found that the most powerful emotional drive at work in a sale is loss aversion—not wanting to sell a home for less than what you paid for it.

In a study in The Quarterly Journal of Economics, researchers found that homeowners latch on to the price they paid for their home with the hope that they can get more when they put it on the market. But that isn’t the soundest idea, says Christopher Mayer, a co-author of the study and a professor of real estate and economics at Columbia Business School, especially if your house has depreciated in value. It’s a fallacy to assume that you’ll be able to recoup losses you’ve already incurred. The current market price has nothing to do with how much a person actually paid for it.

There is a nuance here, though. People who stubbornly stick to an asking price above market value risk not selling their house at all. But sometimes they are rewarded.

Mr. Mayer and a co-author analyzed housing data from downtown Boston in the 1990s, culled from a boom-bust cycle. Condominium owners who put their houses up for sale above the market rate—though still below what they paid for them—sold their homes for more than expected, even as their properties lingered on the market for longer than usual.

Interesting article – what are your thoughts?

I read this article at: http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-psychology-of-buying-and-selling-a-house-1465783741

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

 

Existing-Home Sales Lose Momentum in July

Existing-Home Sales Lose Momentum in July

Existing-home sales lost momentum in July because of stubbornly low inventory on the market across the country, according to the National Association of REALTORS®. Last month, existing-home sales posted their first year-over-year drop since November 2015.

Total existing-home sales, which includes completed transactions for single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops, dropped 3.2 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.39 million in July. Sales are 1.6 percent below a year ago.

“Severely restrained inventory, and the tightening grip it’s putting on affordability, is the primary culprit for the considerable sales slump throughout much of the country last month,” says NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. “REALTORS® are reporting diminished buyer traffic because of the scarce number of affordable homes on the market, and the lack of supply is stifling the efforts of many prospective buyers attempting to purchase while mortgage rates hover at historical lows.”

Here’s a closer look at the data from July:

  • Home prices: The median existing-home price for all housing types was $244,100, up 5.3 percent from a year ago.
  • All-cash sales: Comprising 21 percent of transactions in July, all-cash sales were down from 23 percent a year ago. It is the lowest share of cash sales since November 2009 (when it was 19 percent). Individual investors account for the bulk of cash sales and purchased 11 percent of homes in July, down from 13 percent a year ago.
  • Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales made up 5 percent of sales, down from 7 percent a year ago. It is the lowest share since NAR began tracking distressed sales in October 2008. Broken out, 4 percent of sales last month were foreclosures, while 1 percent were short sales. Foreclosures, on average, sold for a discount of 18 percent below market value; short sales were discounted an average of 16 percent.
  • Days on market: Forty-seven percent of sold homes were on the market for less than a month. Properties typically stayed on the market for 36 days in July, down from 42 days a year ago. Short sales were on the market the longest, at a median of 95 days, while foreclosures sold in 54 days. Non-distressed homes averaged 34 days on themarket.
  • Inventory levels: Total housing inventory by the end of the month inched up by 0.9 percent to 2.13 million existing homes for sale. Still, that is 5.8 percent lower than a year ago. Inventories have declined year-over-year for the last 14 consecutive months. Unsold inventory is at a 4.7-month supply at the current sales pace.

“Although home sales are still expected to finish the year at their strongest pace since the downturn, thanks to a very strong spring, the housing market is undershooting its full potential because of inadequate existing inventory combined with new-home construction failing to catch up with underlying demand,” Yun says. “As a result, sales in all regions are now flat or below a year ago, and price growth isn’t slowing to a healthier and sustainable pace.”

Source: National Association of REALTORS®

 I read this article at: http://realtormag.realtor.org/daily-news/2016/08/24/existing-home-sales-lose-momentum-in-july?om_rid=AACmlZ&om_mid=_BXvfk$B9RrPPgx&om_ntype=RMODaily

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Connect with us professionally at LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrinawendtcaton

Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

 

10 Principles of Organizing That Work in Every Room

10 Principles of Organizing That Work in Every Room

Feeling overwhelmed by your stuff? Here’s how to make your things more findable and easier to put away

Getting your home organized is a great feeling, but figuring out where to start can be overwhelming. Keep the process simple by zeroing in on these 10 principles of organizing, which can be applied to any space, anytime.

  1. Get to know active vs. passive zones. Active zones are the spots in your home that you pass or touch daily (usually multiple times a day), and include the entryway, top drawers and eye-level shelves and cabinets.

Passive zones are the less frequently used spaces in your home, including the guest room, garage or basement, very high and very low shelves, and nooks deep within closets.

A common organizing mistake is to clutter your prime active zones with items you don’t frequently need. For example: Don’t keep your spare lightbulbs in the top drawer in the kitchen when you only need to grab one every few months!

  1. Make open storage beautiful. Every home can use a combination of open and closed (i.e., hidden) storage. But what you choose to store on your open shelving should be visually pleasing. In the living room, this is a good place for books (arranged by color if you’re feeling artsy) and pretty objects, not beaten-up board games and stacks of video games. Likewise in the kitchen, open shelving is the place to put your matching sets of clear drinking glasses or favorite teacups, not the plastic food storage containers.
  2. Keep things findable. Out of sight, out of mind is an especially apt expression when it comes to organizing. Clear containers are ideal when you want to be able to see the contents at a glance, and open baskets can corral loose items while still letting you look inside.

If you use containers that aren’t transparent, be sure to label them clearly — or take it a step further and label each with a photo of the objects inside. (Instant cameras are ideal for this.)

  1. Make it easy to put away. This is most important when it comes to kid stuff, but we can all benefit from this rule.

When you need to go get something, you’ll get it out — it doesn’t really matter where it is — but when it’s time to clean up, we all get a little lazy.

To increase the likelihood of stuff being put back in its place, use easy-to-access bins, baskets and hampers, simple filing systems, and wall hooks for frequently used items.

  1. Group by task. I think of this as the first-aid kit phenomenon: When you need a Band-Aid, you may also need some antibiotic ointment, maybe some tweezers to remove a splinter, and a gauze pad; in a first-aid kit, everything you need to complete the task of caring for your injury is conveniently located in one place.

When you’re organizing your stuff, remember this and group everything you need to complete a task in the same place.

For example, you could make one box for medications, another for spare office supplies, one for holiday cookie cutters and sprinkles, and so on. Labeled shoebox-size boxes (like the ones shown here) work well for grouping small items together.

  1. Create a way station for items in transit. We all have a certain amount of stuff that’s constantly in transit: library books waiting to be returned, our bag and keys, the dog’s leash, the casserole dish a friend left after your last party.

Instead of allowing these random items to pile up, create a dedicated space that can handle them and keep them neat.

If you have room by the main entrance to your home, this is the most logical spot — a few baskets on a shelf and some wall hooks should do the trick.

  1. Subdivide and conquer. Wide-open drawers are an invitation to clutter. Anytime you have a drawer where you’ll be storing small items, use a drawer organizer. Use them for cutlery in the kitchen, office supplies in your desk, small and useful household items in your junk drawer, and daily essentials (sunglasses, keys) in a drawer near the entry.
  1. Go vertical. What happens when you go for something at the bottom of a pile? That’s right, it topples.

Avoid this organizing nightmare and go vertical instead. Use shelf risers to increase cabinet capacity, store sheet pans and trays in a vertical holder, and use wall-mounted holders to store brooms and mops so they won’t tip over.

  1. Choose the right container for the job. It can be heartbreaking to find that some of your most precious items — old family photographs, Grandma’s wedding gown — have been ruined thanks to improper storage.

Take preventative measures by choosing the right storage container for the job. Photographs and paper memorabilia should be stored in acid-free containers or albums, and textiles should be kept in breathable storage boxes or bags designed for that purpose.

  1. Store heavy items down low. You should never have to balance on a stepladder while trying to lift something heavy.

Keep heavy items at or below waist height, including boxes, kitchen equipment (those dutch ovens and stand mixers weigh a ton!) and anything else that takes some real effort to lift.

And if you live in earthquake country, this is doubly important: You don’t want heavy items falling out of high cupboards and landing on someone’s head.

Tell us: What’s your biggest home-organizing challenge?

I read this article at: http://www.houzz.com/ideabooks/66905378?utm_source=Houzz&utm_campaign=u3264&utm_medium=email&utm_content=gallery2

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  

Email Sabrina & Susan at: Info@TheCatonTeam.com

Call us at: 650-568-5522

Want Real Estate Info on the Go? Download our FREE Real Estate App:  http://thecatonteam.com/mobileapp

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Connect with us professionally at LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrinawendtcaton

Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

http://ajourneythroughhomeownership.wordpress.com

Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

 

7 Things Every Homeowner Should Do Once a Year

I enjoy sharing articles like this – which reminds me I really should go through that junk drawer….

 7 Things Every Homeowner Should Do Once a Year

Look how responsible you are

When you bought your house, there were a million and ten things you needed to do. (Hi, inspection, mortgage application and downstairs bathroom conversion.) But over the years, auto-pilot has set in, and those driveway pavers you always meant to replace are still staring you in the face. Stay on top of your home maintenance to-dos by making sure you tackle each of the following once a year.

Clean your gutters

Old frisbees. Dead leaves. Dead rodents. (Ew.) Nasty stuff can accumulate in your gutters, and keeping them clear is super important for getting snow and rain off that fancy new roof you just replaced. Here’s the best part: If you get them cleaned right now, you won’t have to think about them again until 2017.

Steam clean your carpets


Yes, you’re a hygienic person who generally doesn’t track gross stuff into her house. But over time, buildup has a way of accumulating–especially in snowy or dusty regions, or if you’ve got children or pets. Rent a steamer (or hire a professional), and relish in a pile that’s as plush and vibrant as the day you bought it.

Wash your windows… like, for real


Again, you’re probably already Windex-ing the inside of those suckers on a weekly or monthly basis. But the outsides need love, too. Most modern windows pivot inward, so you can wash the whole thing from inside your house. But if you live in an older building and can’t get to windows on the second or third floor, hire a gent with a squeegee and a ladder.

Empty all your drawers


OK, this one isn’t just for home owners, but anyone who lives in a house should really be in the habit of emptying and assessing every drawer one time per calendar year. Tackle it room-by-room, taking everything out, deciding if you really need it, then purging accordingly before neatly repacking.

Trim your trees

Next-door neighbor Frank hates when your sycamore cascades over his tool shed. Trim that puppy once a year for the health of your tree (a heavy bow is never a good thing) and, of course, your neighborly relations.

Schedule the exterminator


If you think you only need to talk to Larry the Roach Guy when you’ve actually got creepy crawlers, think again. Getting your house checked and treated preemptively for bugs gives you a much better chance of not finding something disgusting (or paying thousands of dollars for termite damage) down the road.

Check out an open house in the neighborhood

Even if you plan to live in your home until they take you out on a stretcher, it’s always a good idea to get a sense of the market. Plus, aren’t you dying to know what Kenny and Margaret did with that hideous wood-paneled rec room?  You know you want to.

I read this article at: http://www.purewow.com/home/things-home-owners-should-do-yearly?utm_medium=email&utm_source=national&utm_campaign=Best_of_Web_6_28_2016_06_28_b&utm_content=Food_editorial

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  

Email Sabrina & Susan at: Info@TheCatonTeam.com

Call us at: 650-568-5522

Want Real Estate Info on the Go? Download our FREE Real Estate App:  http://thecatonteam.com/mobileapp

Visit our Website at:   http://thecatonteam.com/

VISIT OUR INSTAGRAM PAGE: http://instagram.com/thecatonteam

Visit us on Facebook:   http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sabrina-Susan-The-Caton-Team-Realtors/294970377834

Yelp us at: http://www.yelp.com/biz/the-caton-team-realtors-sabrina-caton-and-susan-caton-redwood-city

Or Yelp me: http://www.yelp.com/user_details_thanx?userid=gpbsls-_RLpPiE9bv3Zygw

Connect with us professionally at LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrinawendtcaton

Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

http://ajourneythroughhomeownership.wordpress.com

Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

Pokémon Go is everywhere — is there a real estate angle?

Oh this article caught my attention – should I download Pokémon Go for my next open house?  What are your thoughts?

Pokémon Go is everywhere — is there a real estate angle?

A Craigslist user is trying to attract roommates with walkable Pokéstops, while some agents have already capitalized on the trend

BY MARIAN MCPHERSON

 

Key Takeaways

  • The late ’90s and early 2000s Japanese anime cartoon Pokémon has resurfaced with the augmented reality game Pokémon Go.
  • Pokémon Go brings the world of Pokémon to life, and allows players to catch elusive Pokémon everywhere — in their house, their backyard, or even in public places such as their neighborhood, local parks and stores.
  • Pokémon Go might work its way into real estate listings, with sellers boasting about the number of Pokémon training gyms and PokéStops in their neighborhood.

Some agents have already begun using the game to draw in potential buyers at open houses.

Real estate listing descriptions can be a fascinating reflection of regional character and culture. Idaho loves its soaker tubs, while Alaskans can’t get enough Southern exposure.

The latest trend taps into a quirky cultural phenomenon that has resurfaced since its beginnings in the late ’90s and early 2000s — Pokémon.

Pokémon is a Japanese anime cartoon that debuted in 1997, and took us into the magical world of Ash Ketchum, a young boy who wanted to be the greatest Pokémon trainer of them all.

From there, the brand expanded into apparel, card and video games, books and even the silver screen. For those new to the game, Pokémon are fictional creatures that humans (aka Pokémon trainers) catch and then prepare for battle.

The little monsters have unique names such as Charmander, Squirtle and, of course, Pikachu — the game’s brand ambassador — and come with their own set of strengths and traits. But you don’t need to know that to enjoy the game. In fact, most people don’t.

The Pokémon craze fizzled a bit when millennials started to grow up and move on to other obsessions — such as Facebook, selfies and twerking.

But, over the past week, Pokémon resurfaced with a new game, Pokémon Go, and claimed the hearts of millennials and others alike, who were in need of some nostalgia after a hard week.

Pokémon Go, available on Android and iOS, brings the world of Pokémon to life with augmented reality and challenges players to travel around their neighborhoods and cities to catch Pokémon and battle other trainers at Pokémon gyms — there are more than five in my Oklahoma City neighborhood alone.

Pokéstops — where users can collect free (virtual) items that power their Pokémon — along with actual buildings designated as “gyms” are high-traffic areas within the game and get players out of the house walking around in the real world. Pokémon Go surpassed Whatsapp this week in average number of engaged minutes per day.

And just like any other trend — Snapchat, Periscope and Facebook Live — Pokémon Go has found its way into real estate.

Two days ago, Pokémon Go tweeted a realistic-looking home listing that included the text: “Conveniently located between 2 Pokémon Gyms and has 8 Pokéstops within walking distance.”

For nerds the world over, this hot listing feature might be just what they’re looking for right now.

The game has actually found its way into a Craigslist ad. This apartment is located between two Pokémon gyms and has eight PokéStops within walking distance. Who could pass that up?

Moerover, a viral Zillow “listing” — which appears to be a meme — boasts two, yes two, Pokémon Go gyms and seven PokéStops that would be heaven for any aspiring trainer who is looking to “catch em all” in their neighborhood.

The members of Lab Coat Agents (LCA) quickly caught onto the craze and discussed how the game is now being used to sell homes.

“This game is sweeping the nation so fast that agents are referencing it in the description,” says LCA co-founder Nick Baldwin. “It’s amazing how pop culture can be [used] to sell homes.”

Some agents on the thread were still trying to figure out what Pokémon is, while others had already caught on and started using it in Facebook ads for open houses.

Mandy Panozzo-Clay says she used Pokémon Go as a way to attract potential buyers at an open house in a young, hip area of her town.

“It was super basic. It was in our town’s ‘hip’ page with a link and photo of the house I was having an open house at and it said ‘looking for Pokémon? We have plenty here at…,’” says Panozzo-Clay.

“Got a lot of response and some clicks to my website. I will do some more for my open houses next week.”

On the flip side, the app poses a few real-estate related risks, as shown by the man living with his wife in a converted church in Massachusetts.

Turns out, Pokémon Go has designated many churches as “gyms” — so the couple had an onslaught of gamers flocking to their property. Potential buyers who’d rather not deal with the commotion could be deterred by the game’s neighborhood impact.

In addition to safety risks, Lab Coat Agent member Greg Lyles warned fellow agents about using Pokémon Go snapshots in social media and print ads — they could result in possible copyright infringement violations that come with a hefty maximum fine of $150,000.

“It may seem like a lot of fun to include the characters in your ads, but you are subjecting yourself, and your broker, to a potential copyright violation lawsuit,” says Lyles.

“Lots of people incorrectly believe that just because something exists out there on the Internet, it’s a free for all. Not true.”

According to the Pokémon website, users “should assume that everything you see or read on http://www.pokemon.com is copyrighted — unless otherwise noted — and may not be used except as stated in the Pokémon Terms of Use or with the written permission of The Pokémon Company International (“Pokémon”).”

Pokémon Go is part of the Pokémon site, so it seems that the rule would apply to using game images for advertising. Although it would seem unlikely for the Pokémon Company International to start slapping real estate agents with lawsuits, it is a risk to consider before making an ad.

Inman Ambassador Stacie Perrault Staub made a post on her individual page, predicting that real estate agents will soon be capitalizing on this game with seminars.

“Place your bets, please,” Staub wrote. “How long until someone starts trying to sell real estate agents a downloadable guide or webinar called ‘How to Sell More Homes Using Pokémon Go?’”

Staub also offered some insight on whether this trend will prove its longevity in real estate or die off as quickly as it started.

“I think Pokémon Go has the potential to spark innovation along the same framework as the game, by targeting real estate consumers as a way to spur interaction, facilitate live real estate events like open houses and neighborhood tours, etc.,” Staub told Inman.

“Do I think Realtors should start trying to buy ads on Pokémon Go? No. But might it start conversations with app creators in our space? I’d bet on yes.”

Whatever the future may bring, catch all the buyers you can before Pokémon Go goes away.

I read this article at: http://www.inman.com/2016/07/11/pokemon-go-everywhere-real-estate-angle/?utm_source=20160716&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=weeklyheadlinesPM&utm_content=1

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  

Email Sabrina & Susan at: Info@TheCatonTeam.com

Call us at: 650-568-5522

Want Real Estate Info on the Go? Download our FREE Real Estate App:  http://thecatonteam.com/mobileapp

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Connect with us professionally at LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrinawendtcaton

Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

http://ajourneythroughhomeownership.wordpress.com

Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

7 Inexpensive Ways to Boost Your Home’s Curb Appeal

7 Inexpensive Ways to Boost Your Home’s Curb Appeal

Your neighbors will be so jealous…

Whether you’re trying to sell your house or simply make your home the envy of everyone on your cul-de-sac, trust us: A little goes a long way. Here, seven ways to refresh your front door (and beyond) without breaking the bank.

PAINT YOUR DOOR

A fresh coat of paint–colorful or not–goes a long way when it comes to updating your exterior view. While you’re at it, replace (or touch up) your hardware–like the doorknob and knocker.

REPLACE YOUR HOUSE NUMBERS

Pick up a set that has a matte or metallic sheen. It’ll look expensive and polished, not to mention easier to read from the street. (You’re welcome, UPS guy.)

PRESSURE WASH YOUR FRONT PORCH

It’s a great way to remove deeply set dirt stains and will give your porch that brand-new and shiny vibe. (You can even add a bit of wood cleaner to really get the job done.) Don’t own a pressure washer? Rent one from your local Home Depot for about $35 a day.

INSTALL SOLAR LIGHTS

You don’t have to break the bank to add a bit of accent lighting to your front yard. An eight-pack of solar lights costs about $27 on Amazon. Use them to accentuate freshly pruned trees or shrubs–or simply to illuminate the path to your front door.

MAKE OVER YOUR MAILBOX

If it’s busted–get a new one. Or take it a step further by planting a variety of resilient and colorful flowers and shrubs (think hydrangea or elephant ears) at the base of the box.

ADD WINDOW BOXES FILLED WITH BLOOMS

In addition to being inexpensive, window boxes are easy to install (you often don’t even have to drill) and won’t damage your house’s facade. Stick them in the windows to the left and right of your front door and fill them with plants like marigolds and petunias that thrive on direct sunlight.

REPAINT (OR REPLACE) YOUR GUTTERS

If they’re peeling and cracked, sand gutters and downspouts down and apply a fresh coat of paint. Or–if you’re in the mood for something a bit fancier–you could upgrade the whole system with sleek copper piping.

I read this article at: http://www.purewow.com/home/curb-appeal-tips

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  

Email Sabrina & Susan at: Info@TheCatonTeam.com

Call us at: 650-568-5522

Want Real Estate Info on the Go? Download our FREE Real Estate App:  http://thecatonteam.com/mobileapp

Visit our Website at:   http://thecatonteam.com/

VISIT OUR INSTAGRAM PAGE: http://instagram.com/thecatonteam

Visit us on Facebook:   http://www.facebook.com/pages/Sabrina-Susan-The-Caton-Team-Realtors/294970377834

Yelp us at: http://www.yelp.com/biz/the-caton-team-realtors-sabrina-caton-and-susan-caton-redwood-city

Or Yelp me: http://www.yelp.com/user_details_thanx?userid=gpbsls-_RLpPiE9bv3Zygw

Connect with us professionally at LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/sabrinawendtcaton

Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

http://ajourneythroughhomeownership.wordpress.com

Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008