Homebuyers Worry Most About Cost and Competition in Latest Survey

Homebuyers Worry Most About Cost and Competition in Latest Survey

 One in Four Buyers Looking to Flee Expensive Rental Market

Affordability is the main concern keeping homebuyers up at night, according to a survey of 975 buyers conducted this month by Redfin, the next-generation real estate brokerage.

One in four respondents cited affordability as their top concern in buying a home, making it the most common response. Competition was the next-most common worry, cited by one in five homebuyers, a number that has increased from one in 10 in November. These concerns are justified: last month home prices were up 5 percent from a year ago, and 60 percent of Redfin offers have faced competition thus far in May.

Many of those looking to buy are fleeing an expensive rental market. About one in four homebuyers surveyed this month cited high rent as their reason for house hunting, a significant jump since last summer.

The change is attributable to first-time buyers. In the most recent survey, more than fifty percent said high rent led them to the market, as compared to only 25 percent of first-timers in August.

“Though enticed by high rents and low mortgage rates to begin a home search, first-time buyers face a number of obstacles in todays competitive market,” said Redfin chief economist Nela Richardson. “In many cities, starter homes have seen the largest price increases because the supply of affordable homes on the market is so low and the demand for these homes is so high.”

Buyers were asked to choose up to three of the most important factors in a home, beyond square footage and price. Three choices rose to the top: the layout, finishes and design were most important (46%), followed by school quality (41%) and a yard or green space (39%). Ease of commute came in fourth, checked off by 32 percent of respondents.

I read this article at: http://press.redfin.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=252734&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=217296

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Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

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Homeownership More Profitable for Single Men Than Single Women

Well this headline got my attention… 

Homeownership More Profitable for Single Men Than Single Women

Single Men Owners Have Gained $10,000 (16 Percent) More in Home Value Since Purchase;

Housing Gender Gap Widens with More Years of Homeownership

IRVINE, Calif. – May 26, 2016 — RealtyTrac® (www.realtytrac.com), the nation’s leading source for comprehensive housing data, today released an analysis showing homes owned by single men on average are valued 10 percent more and have appreciated $10,112 (16 percent) more since purchase than homes owned by single women.

The analysis covered more than 2.1 million single family homes nationwide owned by either single men (1,139,493) or single women (1,011,572) based on public record tax assessor data collected by RealtyTrac.

The average estimated current market value of homes owned by single men was $255,226 — 10 percent higher than the average current market value of homes owned by single women: $229,094.

Homes owned by single men have gained an average of $63,921 since purchase, a 33 percent return on purchase price. That was $10,112 (16 percent) more than the average $53,809 gain since purchase for homes owned by single women, a 31 percent return on purchase price.

“Women earn less than men on average — 19 percent less in 2015 according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics — giving them less purchasing power when it comes to buying a home,” said Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at RealtyTrac. “So it’s not surprising to see the 10 percent gender gap in average home values between single men and single women homeowners; however, the slower home price appreciation for homes owned by single women demonstrates that less purchasing power is also having on a domino effect on their ability to build wealth through homeownership as quickly as single men.”

Housing gender gap widens with more years of homeownership

Among homes owned for at least 15 years, those owned by single men on average had a current market value of $288,912 — 17 percent higher than the average current market value of homes owned by single women: $240,166.

Homes owned for at least 15 years by single men have gained an average of $170,765 since purchase — a 145 percent return on purchase price. That was $36,496 more than the average $134,269 gain since purchase for homes owned at least 15 years by single women — a 127 percent return on purchase price.

Years Owned Home Value Gender Gap Home Value Gain Gender Gap Home Value ROI Gender Gap
10 Years or Fewer $18,185

 

(7 percent)

$6,266

 

(16 percent)

209 basis points
More Than 10 Years $38,872

 

(14 percent)

$19,781

 

(20 percent)

569 basis points
More Than 15 Years $48,746

 

(17 percent)

$36,496

 

(21 percent)

1774 basis points
All Years $26,132

 

(10 percent)

$10,112

 

(16 percent)

272 basis points

Markets with biggest housing gender gap

Average values of homes owned by single men were the highest above average values of homes owned by single women in the District of Columbia (14 percent higher), followed by Florida (12 percent higher), West Virginia (12 percent higher), Wisconsin (12 percent higher), Texas (10 percent higher), and Alabama (10 percent higher).

There were three states where the average values of homes owned by single women were higher than the average values of homes owned by single men: Massachusetts (11 percent higher), Kentucky (2 percent higher), and Kansas (1 percent higher).

Average home value gains for homes owned by single men were highest above average home value gains for homes owned by single women in West Virginia (72 percent higher), Wisconsin (41 percent higher), Alabama (40 percent higher), Maine (35 percent higher), and Minnesota (34 percent higher).

There were eight states where single women homeowners have realized bigger home value gains since purchase than single men homeowners, led by New York (30 percent more), New Jersey (29 percent more), North Dakota (22 percent more), Massachusetts (11 percent more) and Virginia (8 percent more).

Single women tend to own homes in areas with a higher density of criminal offenders

The analysis also looked at neighborhood characteristics in zip codes with a higher share of single men homeownership compared to neighborhood characteristics in zip codes with a higher share of single women homeownership.

In zip codes with a higher share of single women homeownership, the average RealtyTrac Registered Criminal Offender Index was 19.19 — 7 percent higher than the average index of 17.87 in zip codes with a higher share of single man homeownership. The RealtyTrac Registered Criminal Offender Index is based on the number of registered criminal offenders (including sex offenders, child predators, kidnappers and violent offenders) as a percentage of total population.

Single women tend to own homes in areas with lower environmental hazard risk

In zip codes with a higher share of single woman homeownership, the average RealtyTrac Environmental Hazards Housing Risk Index was 45.69 — 23 percent lower than the average index of 59.40 in zip codes with a higher share of single man homeownership. The RealtyTrac Environmental Hazards Housing Risk Index is based on the prevalence of five manmade environmental hazards: air quality, superfund sites, polluters, brownfields and former drug labs.

About RealtyTrac

RealtyTrac collects and licenses multi-sourced public record real estate data — including tax, deed, mortgage, foreclosure, and proprietary neighborhood and parcel-level risk — for more than 150 million U.S. properties, providing access to that data for businesses, consumers, policy makers and the media in a variety of venues all designed to increase real estate transparency: RealtyTrac.com is a property search and research portal for foreclosures and other off-market properties; Homefacts.com is a neighborhood research portal providing hyperlocal risks and amenities; HomeDisclosure.com produces detailed property pre-diligence reports; and RealtyTrac Data Solutions delivers real estate data and analysis to businesses through bulk file licenses, APIs, trend reports, and customized marketing lists. RealtyTrac data is cited by thousands of media outlets each month, including frequent mentions on CBS Evening News, The Today Show, CNBC, CNN, FOX News, PBS NewsHour and in The New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and USA TODAY.

RealtyTrac Media Contact:

Jennifer von Pohlmann

949.502.8300, ext. 139

jennifer.vonpohlmann@realtytrac.com


Data and Report Licensing:

800.462.5193

datasales@realtytrac.com

 

I read this article at: http://www.realtytrac.com/news/home-prices-and-sales/realtytrac-housing-gender-gap-analysis/

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

Love, Marriage and Real Estate

The Newlyweds’ Guide to Buying a Home

 

Hey, lovebirds: If you’re newly married, you may be thinking of buying a nest together. Indeed, 35% of married Americans purchased their first home together within two years of tying the knot, according to a study by Coldwell Banker. Yet while we hear plenty about the home-buying challenges faced by unmarried couples, that doesn’t mean that marriage makes this process a walk in the park.

“A lot of factors come into play,” says Brandy Wright, a certified financial planner at Cambridge Wealth Counsel in Atlanta. So before you start swooning over Craftsman bungalows or granite countertops where you envision your bright new future, be sure to sit down and ask each other these crucial questions first.

What’s your credit score?

Back in your dating days, you two probably talked about everything from where you’ve traveled to your favorite movies. But now, as newlyweds, it’s time to get serious and broach a far less romantic topic: your credit scores.

In fact, if you’re truly smart, you will have had this conversation already: Half of married couples in the U.S. say that credit scores were a make-or-break factor when choosing their mate, according to an Experian Consumer Services survey. But for other couples, credit is a taboo subject. Unfortunately, if one person’s credit score is substantially lower than the other’s, that could hinder the couple’s ability to qualify for a loan, or at least get an attractive interest rate.

“Knowing your credit scores before you meet with a lender is crucial,” says Wright. Doing so will also give you the opportunity to work on repairing any credit issues before you apply for a mortgage. You can also get a free copy of your full report at AnnualCreditReport.com, although for the exact score you’ll need to pay a small fee. Or check with your credit card company; many offer free access to scores.

Where would you like to live in five years?

Your future goals will affect which type of home—and loan—is right for you. For instance, if you’re planning to stay put for the foreseeable future, then a 30-year mortgage with a fixed interest rate may make the most sense, since this means your interest rate (and monthly payment) remains constant over the life of the loan.

On the other hand, if you’re planning to move within a few years—say, to a larger home to raise a family or move closer to your in-laws—then you should consider other options. For instance, an adjustable-rate mortgage offers a lower interest rate than a fixed mortgage for an initial period of time, such as three to seven years. After that point, it can adjust up or down based on market indexes.

Will one of us stay home to raise the kids?

Fine, you’ve just gotten hitched, so why rush the discussion about kids? Because this question will affect your family’s income, which is the cornerstone for determining how much home you can afford. A good rule of thumb: “Your mortgage expenses should be no more than 30% of your take-home income,” advises Wright. (Use realtor.com’s Home Affordability Calculator to assess your buying power.)

But keep in mind, you could be paying off that mortgage for 30 years, so you should not only tally how much your family makes now, but also what you anticipate your salary to be in the future. What happens if and when you have kids, and one of you wants to stay home to raise them? That could slash your income in half. So when anticipating how much of a mortgage to get, play it safe. Just because you get pre-approved for $1 million doesn’t mean you should buy a $1 million house.

What happens to the home if our marriage hits the rocks?

Although this is a happy time in your relationship, you need to consider all possible outcomes for your marriage. Translation: If you get hit with death or divorce, you’ll need to work out how to divide your assets.

There are several types of homeownership to choose from when purchasing property with your spouse. The most common is joint tenancy, where each person holds equal interest in the property. Its distinguishing factor is that in the event one spouse dies, that person’s interest in the property automatically conveys to the surviving spouse (also know as “right of survivorship”).

Meanwhile, under tenancy in common, each spouse has a distinct, separately transferable interest in the property. This might be a sensible form of ownership if one spouse makes a higher percentage of the down payment or monthly mortgage payments and wants to guard his or her investment in the event of a divorce. Fine, it’s not exactly an upbeat discussion, but you never know what could happen once the honeymoon’s over, so to speak.

I read this article at: http://www.realtor.com/advice/buy/newlyweds-guide-to-home-buying/?link=TD_REALTOR_image_4&cid=soc_editorial62230036&adbid=737799586626969600&adbpl=tw&adbpr=17351940

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

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Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008

 

High Rents May Force Buyers Into the Market

High Rents May Force Buyers Into the Market

Rents have been on the rise for several months now as demand for rental housing has increased due to a short supply of homes for sale, particularly among starter homes, and high down payments. A recent survey showed that the pendulum may be swinging in the other direction, however.

According to a survey of 975 homebuyers conducted by Redfin in May among 36 states and Washington, D.C., one in four homebuyers reported that it was the high cost of rent that prompted them to go hunting for a house—a substantial increase from the share reported last summer. First time buyers drove the increase, with more than 50 percent of them citing high rents as the reason they were looking to buy a home—more than double the 25 percent reported in August.

The change is attributable to first-time buyers. In the most recent survey, more than fifty percent said high rent led them to the market, compared to only 25 percent of first-timers in August.

“Though enticed by high rents and low mortgage rates to begin a home search, first-time buyers face a number of obstacles in today’s competitive market,” said Redfin chief economist Nela Richardson. “In many cities, starter homes have seen the largest price increases because the supply of affordable homes on the market is so low and the demand for these homes is so high.”

Even so, the most common concern among homebuyers was still affordability, with one in four survey respondents naming that as the chief worry. One in five named competition as the most common concern when buying a home, an increase from one in 10 in November’s survey.

“Though enticed by high rents and low mortgage rates to begin a home search, first-time buyers face a number of obstacles in today’s competitive market.”

Nela Richardson, Redfin Chief Economist

With mortgage interest rates at historically low levels (currently under 4 percent), if homebuyers can get past the down payment obstacle, now is an excellent time to buy, according to a Zillow report late last year.

“(Rates) are currently hovering near all-time lows,” said Zillow Chief Economist Svenja Gudell. “This helps keep monthly mortgage payments low. Renters can’t take advantage of mortgage financing each month. Additionally, while home values dropped steeply during the most recent recession and remain below their pre-recession peaks in most areas, rents have been on a slow, steady, upward climb for much of the past decade. Finally, income itself—while showing signs of picking up in recent months—isn’t growing sufficiently to keep pace with growth in rents and is growing far more slowly than it was prior to the recession.”

While high rents may be causing people to search for homes, it remains to be seen how many will actually be able to purchase a home, because the down payment remains a huge obstacle. Zillow reported that consumers are spending an average of twice as much of their monthly income on rents compared with the percentage of income they are spending on mortgage payments—which makes it difficult to save for a down payment.

“There are good reasons to rent temporarily—when you move to a new city, for example—but from an affordability perspective, rents are crazy right now,” Gudell said. “If you can possibly come up with a down payment, then it’s a good time to buy a home and start putting your money toward a mortgage.”

I read this article at: http://www.dsnews.com/news/05-27-2016/high-rents-may-force-buyers-into-the-market

Remember to follow our Blog at: https://therealestatebeat.wordpress.com/

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  

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Call us at: 650-568-5522

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Please enjoy my personal journey through homeownership at:

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina

The Caton Team – Susan & Sabrina – A Family of Realtors

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices – Drysdale Properties

Sabrina BRE# 01413526 / Susan BRE #01238225 / Team BRE# 70000218/ Office BRE #01499008