Renters Are Getting Frustrated

Renters Are Getting Frustrated

The majority of renters say they want to own a home in the future and believe that homeownership is a critical piece of the American dream. But making the leap into homeownership is facing bigger hurdles as the market sees higher home prices and a shortage of homes for sale, according to the National Association of REALTORS®’ newly released Aspiring Home Buyers Profile, which is based on findings from a survey of more than 10,000 households’ attitudes about the real estate market.

Non-homeowners surveyed say the main reason why they do not currently own is because they are unable to afford homeownership. Swift price increases and a shortage of homes for sale in most of the country have shaken the confidence of non-owners as they consider buying. As such, the share of non-owners who say now is a good time to buy fell to 58 percent at the end of 2017, following a high of 62 percent in the third quarter of 2017.

“A tug of war continues to take place in many markets throughout the country, where consistently solid job creation is fueling demand, but the lack of supply is creating affordability constraints that are ultimately pulling aspiring buyers further away from owning,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “These extremely frustrating conditions continue to be most apparent at the lower end of the market, which is why the overall share of first-time buyers remains well below where it should be given the strength of the job market and economy.”

Still, non-homeowners’ desire to eventually buy is not waning. They say the following goals most make them want to buy in the future:

•Change in lifestyle, such as getting married, starting a family, or retiring

•Improvement in their financial situation

•Desire to settle down in one location

Until they do buy, non-homeowners expect to face increasing rents. Fifty-one percent of renters surveyed say they expect their rent to increase this year. However, only 15 percent of renters said the increase in rental costs would make them consider purchasing a home.

“Housing demand in 2018 will be fueled by more millennials finally deciding to marry and have kids and the expectations that solid job growth and the strengthening economy will push incomes higher,” Yun says. “However, with prices and mortgage rates also expected to increase, affordability pressures will persist. That is why it is critical for much of the country to start seeing a significant hike in new and existing housing supply. Otherwise, many would-be first-time buyers will be forced to continue renting and not reach their dream of being a homeowner.”

Source: National Association of REALTORS®

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I read this article at: http://realtormag.realtor.org/daily-news/2018/02/07/renters-are-getting-frustrated?tp=i-H43-Bb-1Yi-27VfQ-1p-EHi7-1c-27WWy-1svHsi&om_rid=31342700&Om_ntype=RMOdaily&om_mid=5996

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County rents jump — again

County rents jump — again

February 02, 2015, 05:00 AM By Austin Walsh Daily Journal

As rents continue to skyrocket throughout the region, housing experts say San Mateo County residents should not expect to see relief in the near future.

In the past year, average monthly rents in the fourth quarter increased $227, jumping to $2,572, according to reports from according to RealAnswers, a group that compiles apartment data.

During the fourth quarter in San Mateo, studio apartments increased by an average of $193 from last year, to $1,762 per month, marking a 12.3 percent increase. One-bedroom apartments with one bathroom increased by 10.3 percent on average to $2,332 per month, up $218 from 2013. And two-bedroom, one-bathroom apartments increased $181 per month, to $2,593, a 7.5 percent increase from the previous year, according to the report.

But some renters have seen increases as substantial as $600 in a year, said Josh Hugg, program manager at the Housing Leadership Council of San Mateo County.

Hugg and other advocates for renters promote policies that protects residents from exorbitant rates or increases.

“We need more affordable housing,” Hugg said.

Well-paying technology jobs are frequently cited for driving up costs across the region, but Hugg noted that for every job created in the tech sector, there are multiple support workers who are finding it increasingly difficult to live locally.

“When we bring in all these great jobs, they are creating jobs of more modest means,” Hugg said. “We are not making a place for them, even though they are the fastest growing part of the workforce.”

Some residents are being priced out of their homes, and are forced to move back in with their families to afford the cost of living, said Sally Navarro, a rental, sales and property management Realtor for AVR Realty in Burlingame.

“Everyone is piling in until they find something. Folks are just waiting it out to see what’s going to happen,” she said.

But the outlook is not optimistic for those hoping to see prices drop, she said.

Navarro, who has worked in the local rental industry for nearly three decades, said she has never seen a tougher rental market than what is currently available.

“I don’t see that it’s going to get a lot better,” Navarro said.

The best that renters might hope for is that rates level out from their constant incline. Navarro said that she has not seen rents decrease since the dot-com bubble burst around the turn of the century.

She said that the feeling of dissatisfaction with expensive rents is prevalent throughout the county.

“People are extremely frustrated,” she said.

But it’s not bad for everyone involved in the housing industry, said Navarro.

“I think landlords are very lucky right now,” she said. “They have been reaping the benefits for quite a while.”

But she expressed compassion for those who are trying to find a new place to live in the current market.

“I feel bad for tenants. We don’t know how it’s going to go, or when it’s going to change. In the meantime, we have people looking for places and there is nothing out there. It’s really frustrating,” she said.

Those interested in landing a new place should bring all the preliminary paperwork with them to the appointment, and be willing to pay more than the market rate, Navarro said.

Though the region has reaped the benefits of being a globally acclaimed hub of innovation and is seen as a gold mine for people across the globe, Hugg said the success has come at a substantial cost to those who have lived in the region for years.

“We are a victim of our own success,” he said.

 

I read this article at: http://www.smdailyjournal.com/articles/lnews/2015-02-02/county-rents-jump-again/1776425137606.html?interaction=normal

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Good News for Landlords: Rents Still Rising – Bad News for Tenants

Good News for Landlords: Rents Still Rising  –  Bad News for Tenants

The article below is both good and bad news.  For investors, whom have scooped up deals on the San Francisco Peninsula through the bust, they are raking in the gold with high rents.  For the rentals properties I service, it’s been amazing to see the increase in rent year over year.  But demand is there – and with few homes to buy – the rental market is booming.

For those who are renting, they cringe when they see a letter from their landlord in the mailbox.  Several clients of mine have emailed me this year concerned that their rent went up.  Some as little as $50 – other a more substantial jump.  These renters are the first time buyers of the future.  Skipping dinners out to stash away cash for down payments and closing costs.  And around here – where the median home price starts at $800,000 – we’re not talking pennies and dimes that need to be saved.

Right now the cheapest rental listed on the Multiple Listing Service is a 3 bedroom 1 bath home of about 1050 square feet in the Buri-Buri area of South San Francisco – asking rent is $3,000.  The most expensive rental is a dated but spacious 3 bedroom 4 bath home of close to 4000 square feet in Portal Valley asking for $9,500 a month.  The median rental listed today is a 3 bedroom 2 bath condo in Menlo Park listed at $4,250 a month.

Suddenly that $50 rent increase doesn’t sting as much.

But the word is out – the Bay Area is a wonderful place to live and we’re all paying for it now.  Enjoy this article below…

 

Good News for Landlords: Rents Still Rising

 

Average rental prices have ticked up nearly 4 percent nationwide, according to the latest TransUnion Rental Screen Solutions industry report of data collected from property managers in September 2012 and September 2013.

Rents were on the rise for all four of the classifications of rental properties that TransUnion analyzes: newer institutional properties; older institutional properties; older properties in less desirable areas; and older properties in less desirable areas that are in need of renovations/updating. The average rent of all four types of properties was $1,072 in 2013.

The largest rental increases were seen in properties that were in less desirable areas that need renovations, up 4.2 percent to an average of $693.

“The rental market continues to be strong as demand for rental units remains high while consumer credit risk slowly improves,” says Michael Doherty, senior vice president of TransUnion’s rental screening solutions group. “The combination of improving rental risk scores and continued demand for rental properties is particularly good news for property managers. … When the credit risk of the population improves, property managers may be more inclined to tighten their criteria to ensure they are getting the best possible resident. This is integral because a resident who ‘skips’ out on a lease can cost a property manager thousands of dollars in lost revenues.”

By: DAILY REAL ESTATE NEWS

 

I read this article at:  http://realtormag.realtor.org/daily-news/2014/01/28/good-news-for-landlords-rents-still-rising?om_rid=AACmlZ&om_mid=_BS6BpXB838Asq2&om_ntype=RMODaily

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Top 5 Homebuyer Regrets – Had to share this article…

Please enjoy this article I found…

Top 5 Homebuyer Regrets

By Tara-Nicholle Nelson

In life, and in real estate, there are decisions that, if we had them to do over again, we might do x, y or z differently. But all in all, we are not too upset about how things turned out. “C’est la vie,” as they say.

Then there are the decisions and actions we actively regret, worrying over their long-term consequences, wishing we could have a cosmic do-over, stewing and ruminating over what we did wrong. (In truth, it’s a sign of emotional maturity to see every experience as an education, and to be free from ruminating over even the worst of our regrets. But I digress).

Contrary to popular belief, my experience shows that the vast majority of homebuyers commit what they see as the first type of mistakes, but not those deep, dark regrets. However, those that do have serious regrets can lose many hours of sleep and many thousands of dollars trying to remedy them. Their only gain? Experience and gray hairs.

Here are the top 5 true, deep regrets of homebuyers and some insights for how to prevent them from taking over your own life:

1. Premature buying. This is not at all about timing the market or making sure you get in at the “just-right” moment. There’s not much you can or should do about that. But buying before your life or your finances are ready for homeownership is a transgression that ends up causing serious, long-term regrets for those who end up doing it. Premature buying takes several forms, the most common of which includes jumping the gun and buying before you’ve saved as much as you really need, or before you’ve paid your debt down to the level you really needed to.

Another pervasive form of premature buying is to buy before you’ve truly, deeply, seriously run all your own personal financial numbers, which puts you in the position of forced reliance on what the bank, lender or someone else thinks is affordable, which is often wrong.

Similarly, buying because you feel pressure to get in while the market is keeping prices and interest rates low, rather than because you want and can afford a home, is a surefire path to real estate regret.

2. Buying too small of a house. People who buy too large of a home often realize, several years in, that they simply aren’t using all of their rooms and many either sell and downsize or find ways to put the extra space they have to better use. People who buy too small of a home, on the other hand, are acutely aware of it from the moment their children start fighting, they find themselves and their energy levels deactivated by clutter or they end up realizing that there is no room at the inn for the family members or friends they’d like to house, short or long term.

Buying too large of a home is potentially wasteful of the money spent maintaining, heating and cooling the place; buying too small a home is uncomfortable and frustrating, sometimes intensely so, on a constant basis — hence, the regret it can create.

Avoid this regret by starting your house hunt with a visioning exercise: What do you want your home life to look like in 10 years? Who will live with you? Do you entertain or have overnight guests? What activities do you want or need to be able to do there? Do you want to practice yoga, crafts, have kid-sized homework spaces, work at home, collect classic cars or move your parents in? If so, seek to buy a home that can comfortably fit all these people and their activities, even though they might not all exist — yet.

3. Buying a home you can’t truly afford. You might think that one of the top 5 regrets of homebuyers would be buying at the top of the market. But that’s not the case — I know plenty of buyers who bought at the top, paid top dollar and are still upside down on their homes, yet are still happy with their homes because they can well afford the payment and bought homes that will serve their families very well for the very long term (which will allow their home’s value to recover).

It is much more problematic to simply overextend yourself on a home — no matter what the market dynamics are at the time you buy. People who both bought at the top of the market AND overextended themselves made up the large majority of folks who lost homes, as the mortgage gyrations they went through (i.e., taking short-term, interest-only, adjustable-rate mortgages) in order to qualify for the home in the first place also caused them to be utterly unable to sustain the mortgage once the market declined and their mortgages weren’t able to be refinanced.

If you can’t foresee being able to make the mortgage payment on your home 10 years in the future without refinancing it, that’s a sign you might be approaching the unaffordability danger zone.

4. Incompletely resolving co-buyer conflicts. Many co-buyers are couples, but I’ve also seen parents buy homes with their children, siblings buy homes together and even good friends team up to co-buy a home. Any time there is more than one buyer, there is a chance that the co-buyers will have one or more disconnects in their wants, needs and priorities. Often these are resolved almost effortlessly by the realities of the homes that are on the market (e.g., neither party’s dream home turns out to actually exist, or pricing realities require everyone to compromise); other times, people simply work things out like mature individuals, seeking first to understand their co-buyer’s position, then working out a compromise that works for everyone involved.

But in still other cases, the conflict is never truly, deeply resolved; even on closing day, one side feels completely misunderstood, or caves in for the sake of avoiding conflict, or someone simply throws a tantrum, insisting that they get their way. In these cases, it’s common for the party who feels undermined and trampled on to ruminate on it as they live in the property every single day, ending up with great resentment and anger over the years.

5. Taking on fixing beyond their skill, patience and resource level. It can be heartbreaking to tour one of the many homes on the market that was clearly the subject of a previous owner’s fixer-upper dream but was abandoned in the middle of a remodel. Often, these abandonments happen because the owner simply underestimated what the project would take and ran out of time, energy or, most commonly, money to get the remodeling completed. But it’s even sadder to tour the home of a frustrated fixer whose owner and family still lives in a half-done, very dysfunctional property, and who are getting more and more disgruntled with their situation every time they make a mortgage payment.

I read this article at:  http://lowes.inman.com/newsletter/2012/08/29/news/199628

Got Questions? – The Caton Team is here to help.  Email Sabrina & Susan at:  Info@TheCatonTeam.com

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Thanks for reading – Sabrina